The Washington Post: That moral arc doesn’t bend toward justice all by itself

During the pilgrimage with the Faith & Politics Institute last weekend to western New York state and the landmarks of the abolition and women’s suffrage movements that were centered there, we were reminded that these dark days are neither new nor insurmountable. The scene was a panel I moderated with Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.), Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney (D-N.Y.) and two history professors.

The Washington Post: Stop wondering who’s going to save us...

This time, the pilgrimage was to western New York state and the landmarks of the abolition and women’s suffrage movements that were nurtured and led there. And it was at a lunch after a tour of the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls on July 21 that Nathan Richardson recited his 2008 poem “We,” inspired by June Jordan’s “Poem for South African Women.”

Winston Salem Journal: Rep. John Lewis on the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

"I have not gone back to that spot since. It's just been too hard, too difficult."

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., has led an annual civil rights pilgrimage to Selma, Montgomery and Birmingham, Ala., with the Faith and Politics Institute for 20 years. And every year but one since 1965, the icon told me, he has returned to the sites where he was arrested, brutally beaten and continually bore witness to death in the pursuit of equality under the law for African-Americans. But when it came to Indianapolis, where Lewis was campaigning with Bobby Kennedy on April 4, 1968, the day Martin Luther King was assassinated, Lewis resisted returning. That will change on the 50th anniversary today.

Jonathan Capehart: Rep. John Lewis on the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

"I have not gone back to that spot since. It's just been too hard, too difficult."

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., has led an annual civil rights pilgrimage to Selma, Montgomery and Birmingham, Ala., with the Faith and Politics Institute for 20 years. And every year but one since 1965, the icon told me, he has returned to the sites where he was arrested, brutally beaten and continually bore witness to death in the pursuit of equality under the law for African-Americans. But when it came to Indianapolis, where Lewis was campaigning with Bobby Kennedy on April 4, 1968, the day Martin Luther King was assassinated, Lewis resisted returning. That will change on the 50th anniversary today.

Baltimore Sun: Fifty years later, King’s vision must remain Congress’ cause

This week, our nation marks the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. Last month, we joined colleagues from both sides of the aisle on the Faith and Politics Institute’s annual Civil Rights pilgrimage to pay tribute to King and remember his legacy. Visiting Selma, Montgomery and Memphis on a journey led by our colleague, Civil Rights hero Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, reinvigorated our determination to fight for civil rights and equality in Congress. Standing in Memphis at the site of King’s murder imbued us with a sense of responsibility to carry on the work he led.

Fifty years later, King’s vision must remain Congress’ cause

This week, our nation marks the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. Last month, we joined colleagues from both sides of the aisle on the Faith and Politics Institute’s annual Civil Rights pilgrimage to pay tribute to King and remember his legacy. Visiting Selma, Montgomery and Memphis on a journey led by our colleague, Civil Rights hero Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, reinvigorated our determination to fight for civil rights and equality in Congress. Standing in Memphis at the site of King’s murder imbued us with a sense of responsibility to carry on the work he led.

As King Anniversary Nears, 3 Memphis Sites Key to His Legacy Draw Visitors

Within close proximity of each other in downtown Memphis sit three historic buildings — two of them houses of worship — crucial to the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

All three, which are part of the U.S. Civil Rights Trail, are seeing an influx of visitors as people in the city — and far beyond it — mark the 50th anniversary of the two-month strike by black sanitation workers and other events that led up to his assassination.

Following John Lewis on civil rights journey 'touched by the spirit of history'

It's how congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis, a Georgia Democrat, told 16-year-old Charlotte Potes she should describe her pull toward activism to her skeptical parents.

It was also how every one of us on last weekend's remarkable civil rights pilgrimage felt: touched by the spirit of history.

The Faith and Politics Institute organizes a bipartisan delegation to take this trip every year around the March 7 anniversary of a 1965 march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, by protesters calling for African-Americans to have the right to register to vote.

Walking the Edmund Pettus Bridge with John Lewis

“Write down what’s in your head. Write what’s in your heart,” Peggy Wallace Kennedy told me she told her children when they first walked across the Edmund Pettus Bridge years ago. What fine advice to follow after having walked the span with Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) over the weekend.